Pioneering Results in the Blueprint of U.S. K-12 Computer Science Education

A Google and Gallup partnership measures students' early exposure to computer science and identifies opportunities to influence growth in the industry.

"For most people on Earth, the digital revolution hasn't even started yet. Within the next 10 years, all that will change. Let's get the whole world coding!"
-Eric Schmidt, Executive Chairman, Google

Searching for Computer Science

Year 1 key findings examine student exposures to computer technology, demand for CS schools, opportunities for students to learn about CS and barriers to offering CS in schools.

Full Report

Images of Computer Science

Year 1 findings explore confusion between CS activities and general computer literacy, perceptions of CS careers, stereotypes about who engages in CS and demographic profiles of CS learner students.

Full Report

Trends in the State of Computer Science in U.S. K-12 schools

Year 2 findings focus on key changes from year 1 on opportunities to learn CS (awareness of and access to CS), perceptions of CS, demand for CS and challenges and opportunities for CS in K-12 schools.

Full Report

Diversity Gaps in Computer Science: Exploring the Underrepresentation of Girls, Blacks and Hispanics

A focus on exposure to technology and access to CS learning opportunities across underrepresented groups to identify structural and social barriers faced that could influence a likelihood to enter the CS field.

Full Report

State-Level Reports

The study produced individual summary reports on principals inputs' for 11 key states with sufficient principal responses from Year 1 of the 2014-2015 Google-Gallup survey among 9,693 school principals. The results shed light on the status of offerings and support of computer science in the U.S. K-12 schools in those states, as well as recommendations to broaden access to and participation in CS learning.

Click Here to Access the State Reports

These reports present findings from the first two years of Gallup and Google's multi-year, comprehensive research effort to better understand perceptions of CS and access to CS learning opportunities in K-12 schools in the U.S. In Year 1, Gallup surveyed more than 15,000 seventh- to 12th-grade students and parents of seventh- to 12th-grade students via telephone, and K-12 teachers, principals and superintendents via Web surveys.

In Year 2, Gallup used a similar methodology and surveyed more than 16,000 seventh- to 12th-grade students, parents of seventh- to 12th-grade students, and K-12 teachers, principals and superintendents.

Detail on Year 1

  • Gallup interviewed nationally representative samples of 1,673 seventh- to 12th-grade students, 1,685 parents of seventh- to 12th-grade students and 1,013 first- to 12th-grade teachers via telephone in November and December 2014.
  • Gallup also surveyed a sample of 9,693 K-12 principals and 1,865 school district superintendents in the U.S. via the Web. These groups are not representative of all principals and superintendents in the U.S., and data in the Year 1 reports, including state-level reports, were not weighted.

Detail on Year 2

  • Gallup interviewed nationally representative samples of 1,672 seventh- to 12th-grade students, 1,677 parents of seventh- to 12th-grade students and 1,008 first- to 12th-grade teachers via telephone in December 2014 and January 2015.
  • Gallup also surveyed representative samples of 9,805 K-12 principals and 2,307 school district superintendents in the U.S. via the Web. While results for principals and superintendents in Year 1 were not weighted when Year 1 reports were written, those data were weighted for comparison with weighted Year 2 data in Year 2 reports.
  • Full detail on methodology can be found at the end of each report.

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